RSS

The Weight (Take a Load Off, Fanny)

You can’t tell until you pick it up. This 335 (it’s a 60) could weigh 8 and a half pounds or it could weigh 7 lbs or so. The components are consistent but the weight of the wood is not. Old wood generally weighs less than new wood. Weight and tone are not tied together in a predictable way.

A reader wrote to me and said I have never done a post about the weight of 335’s. I’m not sure how I missed that considering how many people seem to ask what guitars weigh when they are considering a purchase. It was never much of an issue to me until I got older and my back started acting up. Then again, I don’t play standing up that often so even now, it isn’t that much of an issue. But the weight of a guitar is sometimes more than just a question of comfort.

ES-335’s are relatively consistent weight wise. The range is a good bit less than, say, a Les Paul. I’ve had 7.5 lb Les Pauls and I owned a 1972 Les Paul Custom that weighed nearly 13 lbs. The lightest 335 I’ve had weighed just a hair over 7 lbs and was a 62. The high end for a 60’s 335 is around 9 lbs but there are things to consider. A stop tail will weigh less than a Bigsby given that the Bigsby B7 unit itself weighs 12.5 ounces whereas a stop tail and studs weighs around 3 ounces. Another consideration is the somewhat inconsistent depth of the bodies-anywhere from around 1.6″ to 1.8″ and when the body is deeper, the center block is larger (and heavier). I’m going to assume all the maple blocks were the same size and the extra space was taken up by the spruce “filler” element that sits on top of the block. Spruce is pretty light but we’re talking ounces here. The variation in the neck sizes will also affect the weight-there’s a lot more wood in a big neck 59 than there is in a blade neck 61. Again, ounces. The 58’s and some 59 335’s had a three ply thin top and later 335’s all have four plies. That will make a small difference as well.

I’m not a wood expert but I find a great deal of the variation comes from the composition of the wood itself. Much of that weight has to do with the density of the wood and the moisture content. One of the things I don’t like about 70’s Gibsons (besides the subpar build quality) is the weight. 70’s 335’s are generally heavier than their 60’s and 50’s counterparts. I’m going to blame the quality of the wood for that or perhaps the treatment of the wood. The 70’s were about profits and I would bet that Gibson was buying the cheapest grade they could get away with. Folks talk lovingly about “old wood” and I tend to agree that the age of the wood is a factor in the tone (and the weight) of a 335. Wood dries out over time. Moisture has weight. Dry wood weighs less than wet wood. I’m not sure whether the wood used back in the 50’s and 60’s was better dried than wood today but it seems to weigh less.

So, what’s an “average” 335 weigh? Just under 8 lbs. If I had to pinpoint it, I would say 7 lbs 12 ounces. That’s a pretty comfortable weight for most players. I get asked whether weight has any bearing on tone. I would say that it can but it would be impossible to quantify. I’ve played great 335’s that weighed 7 lbs 2 ounces and great ones that weighed 8 lbs 10 ounces. I find the light ones to generally sound sweeter and, for the lack of a better term, “airier”. Or maybe that’s all in my head (or my back). Like I said, I’ve played some killer 335’s that are close to 9 lbs.

What about 345’s and 355’s? That’s a different story. They can weigh up to 10 lbs due to the weight of the stereo components. A Bigsby 345 has an extra 1.5 lbs hanging off it when compared to a 335 stop tail. The choke, Varitone switch and the shielding cans (no cans on a 335 or mono 355) weigh around 12 ounces. Add in the Bigsby and you’re right at 24 ounces (1.5 lbs). Stop tail and studs only weigh a few ounces. That is lessened a little by the cutout in the center block (which 335’s eventually got as well) but you can depend on a stereo ES being noticeably heavier than a 335. Add in the extra weight of the factory Grovers on a 355 and you’ve got a heavy guitar. Even with all that extra weight, it still weighs a lot less than a Les Paul Custom.

A 345 has a little less wood than an early 335 because the center block has a big piece cut out to accommodate the harness and choke. But it has about 3/4 of  pound of extra electronics that a 335 doesn’t have. Add in 12 ounces of Bigsby and you can easily hit 9 lbs. .

 

5 Responses to “The Weight (Take a Load Off, Fanny)”

  1. RAB says:

    Charlie, good discussion as always! The “lighter is always better” mantra for electric guitars has been around for a long time but seems to be less universally held-to than in the past. It still seems extremely heavy guitars are hardly anyone’s preference unless maybe you’re a big macho metal guitarist! I’ve had great sounding guitars of various weights. Given these aging Boomer shoulders I do appreciate a lighter guitar for those long 3 and 4 set gigs. The ‘59 FR (First Rack!) 345 you sold me is wonderfully light given the replacement wiring harness and “Varitone-ectomy”! Best, RAB

  2. RAB says:

    P.S. I stopped playing old Les Paul Standards and Customs due to their weight. My 345 is a “burst killer” so it still delivers classic PAF tones in spades!

  3. Jonathan Krogh says:

    Regarding the varying depth of the bodies: I would theorize that the early assembly of the sides glued onto the centreblock, would be drum sanded level prior to the gluing on of the top and back plates (which already had the spruce fitted in and routed level). If it took a few more passes to level off, that body would be thinner than one that levelled off easily.
    I would say too, that maple and mahogany vary in density enough to be noticable, regardless of moisture content over time

  4. Rod Allcock says:

    Interesting you mention varying body depth. I have always thought 3x5s from about 81/2 onwards somehow seem more bulky than the earlier ones. I’ve never measured any of them (never owned one) but always got the impression they WERE thicker.

  5. okguitars says:

    Some early ones (58-59) are as thin as 1.5″ (or slightly over). By 64, they were 1 3/4″ or slightly over. That will affect the weight
    for sure.

Leave a Reply

Optionally add an image (JPEG only)